Available Now: Going Feral

A memoir in essays from Wandering Aengus Press 

Going Feral Front Cover 20181029

Photo by Tyler Doyle

Next Generation Indie Book Awards Finalist in Nature writing

Purchase from Wilderness Awareness School to support a world-renowned nonprofit nature connection and cultural mentoring organization

Also available directly from Powell’sAmazon, or wherever books are sold

Information for bookstores: ISBN-10: 0578468328; ISBN-13: 978-0578468327; 206 pages, Paperback. Available with standard discount and returnability from Ingram.

 

Going Feral: Field Notes on Wonder and Wanderlust is an examination of a life of wandering in wild nature. With the scientific knowledge and observation skills of an ecologist and the existential inquiry of a philosopher, Heather immerses readers with all their senses in adventures, wanderings, and musings in wild places around the United States. She faces solitude on a deserted island in Maine, spelunks in bat caves in New Hampshire, chases herons on the Florida Gulf coast, and hides out with flamingos in urban Utah. She locks eyes with a cougar in Colorado, traps and bands hawks in Nevada, surveys owls in Oregon, and communes with coyotes in Washington.

As a nomadic and often reclusive introvert, Heather grapples with discomfort among her own kind and resists traditional paths to fulfillment. It is ultimately her intimate bond with the natural world wherever she roams that offers meaning, solace, and a sense of belonging both within and apart from human communities. Part reverential nature writing, part soul-searching memoir, Going Feral is the story of a human animal learning to belong to the earth.

 

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COMING SOON from Homebound Publications

A new memoir-in-essays currently titled

Wolf Tree: A Personal Ecopsychology

Due out in spring of 2022

Wolf Tree is an ecopsychological memoir-in-essays wherein Heather melds her backgrounds in psychology and ecology to examine her relationships with landscapes, animals, and human animals, and the myriad environmental, physiological, and cultural factors that inform those relationships. In lyric or more traditional personal essays, linear narratives or meandering musings, she follows threads of self-awareness, consciousness, solitude vs. escapism, ecophysiology, mental health, and the difficulties and rewards of connecting with all those outside our own skins.